$250,000 for Charleston to Continue Demolition

The Charleston Urban Renewal Authority (CURA) has voted to give Charleston an additional $250,000 to continue their demolition efforts to reduce the amount of vacant and dilapidated properties.

94 houses have been demolished in Charleston but the program was supposed to be over at the end of the month. That is when CURA voted to provide more money.

About 50 more buildings could be demolished with the $250,000.

Read the full story here

West Side Neighborhood Association Reviews BAD Buildings Redevelopment Plan

In April, the West Side Charleston 2008 Revitalization Plan progress was briefly discussed prior to WV BAD Buildings Project Manager Shae Strait discussing the draft of the West Side Neighborhood Association BAD Buildings Final Report. Volunteers had conducted inventories of abandoned and dilapidated buildings in the community to help identify the conditions of the buildings.

Read the full story here.

PAWV Launches New Historic Preservation Loan Fund

Monroe Street in Fairmont looking south towards the Monongahela River – Photo by Shae Strait

The Preservation Alliance of West Virginia has launched a new loan program aimed at getting historic structures rehabilitated. The program is called the Historic Preservation Loan Fund. It is a revolving loan guarantee program to help minimize risk for lending financial institutions in case a borrower defaults and to assist applicants that may not have the capital available for a bank loan. The funds must be used for acquiring, rehabilitating, or redeveloping of a historic building that is on the National Register of Historic Places, a contributing structure to a NRHP district, eligible for the NRHP, or on PAWV’s current list of Endangered Properties.

To learn more, please visit PAWV’s News and Notes article.

WV HDF Re-issues Code Enforcement Technical Assistance RFP

The West Virginia Housing Development Fund has re-issued its Request for Proposals for the new Code Enforcement Technical Assistance Support as part of the Property Rescue Initiative program. The Code Enforcement Technical Assistance program offers up to $10,000 in financial assistance to enhance existing or to create effective code enforcement for communities. The financing can be used for adopting and updating ordinances, procuring a certified code enforcement official, training in code enforcement procedures and practices, personal certifications or department accreditation relevant to code enforcement, and now it also includes contractor labor as it directly relates to demolition of dilapidated residential structures.

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The WVHDF Launches RFP for Code Enforcement Technical Assistance Support

The West Virginia Housing Development Fund has begun accepting Request for Proposals for the new Code Enforcement Technical Assistance Support as part of the Property Rescue Initiative program. The Code Enforcement Technical Assistance program offers up to $10,000 in financial assistance to enhance existing or to create effective code enforcement for communities. The financing can be used for adopting and updating ordinances, procuring a certified code enforcement official, training in code enforcement procedures and practices, and personal certifications or department accreditation relevant to code enforcement.

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2017 BAD Buildings Summit Almost Sold Out

On November 14th, the Northern Brownfields Assistance Center will be hosting the 2017 BAD Buildings Summit at the Erickson Alumni Center in Morgantown, WV. At the BAD Buildings Summit, you can learn how to rehabilitate Brownfields, Abandoned, and Dilapidated (BAD) Buildings in your community by networking with other leaders across the state dealing with the same challenges. Participants will see presentations by resource providers, practitioners, and technical experts on topics including demolition, codes & ordinances, funding, resources, engaging stakeholders, and sustainable reuse options for vacant properties.

Only a few spots remain before registration closes. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to learn more about making an impact in your community and state. You can register here before the last few tickets are gone.

To learn more, please visit the 2017 BAD Buildings Summit page.

City of Huntington Updates Their Unsafe Building Ordinance

PHOTO – A dilapidated home in the City of Huntington

PHOTO – A dilapidated home in Huntington

The Huntington City Council has approved changes to the unsafe building ordinance to help the city address vacant and dilapidated structures.

The changes reflect recent updates to the state code made in the 2017 legislative session that created additional tools for code enforcement officials such as being able to a search warrant to inspect a vacant or dilapidated structure in response to an absent property owner.

These changes will help the city to address blight more effectively and efficiently.

Read the full story from The Herald-Dispatch here.

City of Fairmont Makes Great Strides to Battle Blight

PHOTO – A dilapidated home within the city of Fairmont

In Fairmont, over 300 buildings sit vacant, abandoned or dilapidated.

Some have sat for years in disrepair after their owners died or moved away. Others are owned by heirs who live out of state, and simply forgot about them.

But the residents who live next to them and the city government which has authority over them haven’t forgot.

“As people moved out, who was there to maintain their properties?” City Manager Robin Gomez said. “For many of them, nobody did.”

Read the full story from The Times West Virginia here.

Philly Streets Get Test of Jane Jacobs’ “Eyes on the Street” Effect

Jane Jacobs outside of her home on Spadina Road

In the five-and-a-half decades since Jane Jacobs published “The Death and Life of Great American Cities,” her core contention — that urban vitality and safety are a function of small-scale density, a mixture of uses and “eyes on the street” — has become conventional wisdom in urban theory. But the impact that that notion has enjoyed can be attributed, in large part, to the poetic force of Jacobs’ delivery: The idea that an active “sidewalk ballet” makes neighborhoods safe as well as vibrant seems to jibe with daily experience. Can data bear it out?

According to a new study, maybe.

Read the full story from the Next City here.